Baklavas in Mauerpark

Every time I am reading, I cannot stop comparing other people's work with mine. But how I do that is paying attention to the way they are knitting their set of concepts. I always find interesting the fluency the rest of the word has for using theoretical notions. The confidence they have for naming things… Continue reading Baklavas in Mauerpark

Rethinking journalism from an ethnographic glance. Part II: nosing around

The encounter between me doing journalism and New York City was the reason why I decided to become an ethnographer. But my story does not have anything new, well, perhaps just the location. One of the principal researchers of the well famous Chicago School, Robert E. Park, was also driving in that direction many decades… Continue reading Rethinking journalism from an ethnographic glance. Part II: nosing around

LEDs dancing in choreography and a proposed experiment for my next fieldwork

There is a particular sound one can hear in Times Square. The sound is louder around the W. 47th Street, between Olive Garden’s sidewalk and the TKTS booths under the big red stairs. If you visited the Square after August 8, 2017, perhaps you may know about this. But probably you don't. The sound has… Continue reading LEDs dancing in choreography and a proposed experiment for my next fieldwork

The yoga group

The Chinese woman came to me. Immediately after her “hello,” and without making a pause for letting me reply to her greetings, she started to tell me her story. She was not in Times Square as a tourist she was there working for a group which aim is fighting against the organ harvesting in prisons… Continue reading The yoga group

Rethinking journalism from an ethnographic glance. Part I: The slow and the new

There is a small but also an interesting study field about the relationship between journalism and ethnography (Cramer & McDevitt, 2014; Hermann, 2014) where some scholars have contributed, to a greater extent, to discuss the possibilities and advantages of including ethnography in journalistic work. It is always in this way. The aim of this growing… Continue reading Rethinking journalism from an ethnographic glance. Part I: The slow and the new

Traveling light, an epistemological promise

How can we close the gap between reality and theory? How can we explain a reality that is fluent and that is always changing when the theoretical constructions we use for it are going slower than the world outside? Those questions were proposed by Hugo Zemelman (2012) in a paper about epistemic thinking. According to… Continue reading Traveling light, an epistemological promise

Decomposing the front yard of a library. Some thoughts about territory and territorialization (I)

Many years ago, when I still lived in the metropolitan of Medellin, I was a punk. And as a member of that subculture, I used to go with my punk friends to punk places. One of those places was a library. Well, the outside patio of the library: a big brightly and cemented area near… Continue reading Decomposing the front yard of a library. Some thoughts about territory and territorialization (I)

The Columbus Syndrome

...And an introduction to radical ethnography. Why did I decide to do ethnography? Well, I do ethnography because I consider that through an ethnographical work I can first, follow the trajectories of the objects I am interested in, using any kind of resources from any side and without a determined disciplinary theoretical frame or preconception.… Continue reading The Columbus Syndrome

Lights still on

It was almost midnight and the air was particularly cold due to some sporadic showers during the night. I was seated on a concrete bench in front of an empty and under remodeling spot between Broadway Avenue and W. 47th Street. After 12:00 am, when the area is less transited, a group of workers starts… Continue reading Lights still on